Gary Pig Gold’s Noughtie Twenty-One

Despite an alarming amount of critical mass to (and by) the contrary, there truly was much, much more worth hearing this decade just past than those big Big Star, Beatle, Bob Dylan and even Neil Young box sets.

No, really!

So then, strictly alphabetically speaking as always, here’s what I spent much of January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2009 listening very closely to…..

 

ApartmentSparkle Bicycle
Waikiki Record (2008)

Tatsuya Namai’s radiant pop of the Daniel Johnston-meets-Shonen Knife variety.

 

Alex BrennanThe Last Smile Of The Pied Piper
xtoalex@hotmail.com (2004)

Hopefully Mr. Brennan will be duly hired to give the Beach Boys’ catalog that Beatles Love treatment when the time inevitably arrives.

 

Lindsey BuckinghamUnder The Skin
Reprise Records (2006)

Once insane, always insane.

 

CandypantsCandypants
Sympathy For The Record Industry (2000)

Ronnie Spector fronts Elvis’ Attractions …and THEN some!

 

Casper and the CookiesThe Optimist’s Club
Happy Happy Birthday To Me Records (2006)

What Jason NeSmith and Kay Stanton did on their holidays in New York City.

 

Cheap TrickRockford
Big3 Records (2006)

Remarkably sounding better – and louder – than ever.

 

Dennis Diken with Bell SoundLate Music
Cryptovision Records (2009)

The album Brian Wilson has been trying to make since at least 1986.

 

Johnny DowdWire Flowers: More Songs from the Wrong Side of Memphis
Munich Records (2003)

A sonic sequel to one of the Nineties’ undeniably greatest albums …and artists.

 

Bob DylanModern Times
Sony/BMG Music Entertainment (2006)

Edges out Christmas In The Heart by a mere Santa whisker.

 

Electric PrunesFeedback
PruneTwang (2006)

Proving you can have your re-heated soufflé and eat it, too.

 

Tom JonesMr. Jones
V2 Music (2003)

Wherein Atomic Jones meets Wyclef Jean …by way of “Black Betty” !

 

Bill LloydBack To Even
New Boss Sounds (2004)

Fifteen more examples of most potently powerful pop, Nashville-style.

 

LolasLike The Sun
Jam Recordings (2007)

Tim Boykin and his ever-bright l-o-l-a Lolas honestly do make the kind of records you still think Paul McCartney does.

 

Jack PedlerJack Pedler
Race Records (2001)

The sound of the hardest-working drummer in Canada loading all six strings.

 

The PlaymatesSad Refrain
K.O.G.A. Records (2002)

Forever more than happy to play the Stones against their countrywomen Puffy (AmiYumi)’s Beatles.

 

Raquel’s BoysMusic For The Girl You Love
Jam Recordings (2004)

Just as if Bobby Fuller and those once Flamin’ Groovies were never ever extinguished.

 

Jason RingenbergA Day At The Farm with Farmer Jason
Yep Roc Records (2003)

The definitive alternative to alternative country.

 

Simply SaucerCyborgs Revisited
Sonic Unyon Recording Company (2003)

The nice, nice noise that simply continues to keep on giving.

 

Frank Lee SpragueMerseybeat
Wichita Falls Records (2005)

Exactly as if Brian Epstein had never entered The Cavern.

 

Tan SleeveWhite Lie Castle
Cheft Worldwide (2000)

Wherein George Harrison and even F. Zappa receive the Bacharach and David by way of Todd Rundgren treatment.

 

Teenage HeadTeenage Head with Marky Ramone
Sonic Unyon Recording Company (2008)

Canada’s Ramones finally reunited with their very-long-lost brudder.

 

 

now,

Bring On the Twenty-Oh-Teens !!!

Ten You May Have Missed In 2008

If any of the following remarkable sounds
got lost from your grooves last year,

by all means
hesitate no longer
in lending both ears repeatedly
towards…..

 

1. APARTMENT Sparkle Bicycle
(Waikiki Record)

2. SCOTTY CAMPBELL AND HIS WARDENAIRES
Smokin’ and Drinkin’
(Black Sparrow Records)

3. JOHNNY DOWD A Drunkard’s Masterpiece
(BongoBeat Records)

4. GARFIELDS BIRTHDAY Let Them Eat Cake
(Pink Hedgehog Records)

5. THE GRIP WEEDS Infinite Soul
(Wicked Cool Record Co.)

6. JOE SOKO Floss Like A Beast
(Fuzzy Planet Productions)

7. THE SPONGETONES Always Carry On
(Loaded Goat Records)

8. FRANK LEE SPRAGUE Fulton Chateau
(Wichita Falls Records)

9. THE SQUIRES OF THE SUBTERRAIN
Feel The Sun
(Rocket Racket Records)

10. TEENAGE HEAD Teenage Head With Marky Ramone
(Sonic Unyon Recording Company)

 

…..and

for even more info,

you should Click Right Here !!

 

Frankie Teardrop

Several weeks ago, a random gathering of some of the best musicians from Canada’s greatest musical berg (that’s Hamilton, Ontario, by the way) threw themselves onstage as part of the city’s annual Locke Street Festival. Spearheaded by the one and only Tom Wilson, said ad-hoc combo was busy rocking and rolling things all the way up that street as the sun slid down when suddenly, a most familiar figure was spotted nearby. The lead singer of the one, the only, Teenage Head.

As would later be reported in the press, "I asked Frankie, 'Frankie, fuck man, you've got to come up here and sing,'" Wilson says. "He said, 'You got to give me a hundred bucks.' So I reached into my pocket and I only had fifty, so I asked Dave Rave for the other half. I said, 'Dave, fifty bucks for Frankie.'

"And this was the kind of love they had for Frankie. Dave didn't ask me, 'What for? What does Frankie need fifty bucks for?' He was just pulling it out of his pocket. And Frankie got up and did ‘Let's Shake’."

It turned out to be the last-ever public appearance of Frank Kerr, much better known – and most rightfully so – as Frankie Venom, who along with his high school pals about thirty-three years ago decided to form a band in between spins of Dolls, Stooges and, yes, Flamin’ Groovies records. Remarkably, that little band that could went on to garner two gold and one platinum twelve-inchers of their very own; in fact, their latest, now available from the fine folk over at Sonic Unyon Recordings, actually features Marky Ramone on the drums. Terrifically high praise indeed.

In a scar-studded career that admittedly held more bumps than most bands’, Teenage Head never turned (or toned) things down, never towed anyone’s line, and never ever made a bad record or gave a bad show that I, or anyone else for that matter, should care to recall. And whether slithering across the heat pipes of Toronto’s legendary Crash and Burn club, opening for the Pretenders, Talking Heads and Elvis Costello in front of fifty-thousand at Canada’s Heatwave festival – or belting ‘Let’s Shake’ for and with some old friends on Locke Street on a warm late eve – Frankie Venom was every single inch the Head above all others.

He succumbed to throat cancer on October 15, 2008, aged fifty-two. Your record collection will never be the same.